Conditions

Acne

Teenage acne is common but that doesn’t mean the condition should be ignored.  Mostly aggravated by the abrupt arrival of new hormones that stimulate the dormant oil glands, causing plugging of glands followed by redness, swelling,  and sometimes even pain. Teenage acne is usually emotionally distressing at a time when self-esteem may be somewhat fragile. Treating acne can not only prevent scarring but also alleviate self-esteem concerns. We offer a large variety of acne treatments for teenagers utilizing a broad range of prescription topical medicines, oral prescription antibiotics, and vitamins, chemical peels, hormonal therapy such as birth control and Isotretinoin (Accutane). When deciding how to treat teenage acne, our providers will assist by evaluating all of the options available and assembling a treatment plan with the teen and parent based on a patient’s individual circumstances. The treatment of teenage acne will often combine different modalities based upon the type and severity of the acne. Acne

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Psoriasis

Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease that causes raised, red, scaly patches to appear on the skin, especially the elbows, knees and scalp. Scientists do not know the exact causes of psoriasis but feel that the immune system and genetics play a major role. Psoriasis is associated with other serious health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, and depression. About 30 percent will develop joint pain and psoriatic arthritis. Psoriasis can be mild, moderate or severe in terms of how much area of skin it involves. Some patients are nearly completely covered with this skin condition. This disease has been shown to affect a person’s quality of life. Treatments for mild psoriasis can include topical prescriptions for steroid creams, synthetic Vit D cream, and retinoids. Systemic medicines are pills taken by mouth and are used for patients with moderate or severe psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Some of these systemic medicines include

Read More »

Eczema

Eczema, also known as Atopic Dermatitis, is known as the “itch that rashes.” Between 10-20% of people in the world are affected and, in most cases, it begins to appear very early in life. In young children, atopic dermatitis presents with itchy, red, scaling patches on the scalp and on the cheeks. By adolescence, eczema tends to move to the inner arms and the back of the knees, but can also affect other areas of the body. In adulthood, atopic dermatitis looks like dry, thickened, scaly skin. While the cause of atopic dermatitis is not known, studies do show that patients with eczema have a weak skin barrier. As a result, more irritants and allergens can penetrate. Several factors are known to trigger or make it worse. Possible triggers include irritating soaps or detergents, wool clothing, jewelry, and perfume. Sometimes patients with eczema need skin allergy testing to help get

Read More »

Rashes

Rashes, blisters and itching can be from a common conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, or allergic contact dermatitis.  However, your condition could be a more rare condition such as Dermatitis Herpetiformis associated with Gluten, lupus, vasculitis or malignant T cell lymphoma. These rare diseases are best diagnosed by a board certified dermatologist who has the expertise and experience to know when and how to test for them. Specialized blood tests and skin biopsies are used. If your skin condition is not resolving, the diagnosis must first be reconsidered and more extensive treatment options discussed.  Communication is the most important part of medicine and we will work with our patients so that they can fully understand how to control of their skin disease.

Read More »

Melanoma

Melanoma is cancer of the pigmented cells found in a mole. Melanoma is thought to be due to genetics, excessive sun exposure, tanning booths, and sunburns. Melanoma diagnosis is made through a surgical biopsy or excision of the skin that is done by your dermatologist. The prognosis and treatment of melanoma depend on the type of melanoma, depth of the lesion, and whether has spread to the lymph nodes or other organs. This year there has been an exciting breakthrough with gene testing of the melanoma. The gene testing can be done even if you were diagnosed with melanoma a few years ago. The genes can determine if the melanoma is at risk to spread through the body. This is important because more close follow up can now be done on those people who have melanoma with this specific pattern of genes. We offer this new important testing by CastleRock

Read More »

Hives

Hives are an inflammation of the skin that are identified by their pink or red tones and itchiness. Hives look different from person to person, ranging from tiny dots to large welts. Sometimes, hives occur as the result of an allergic reaction. But for some people, hives can appear without warning, regenerating and staying for weeks or months on end. Dermatology patients who have hives for more than 6 weeks are diagnosed with having chronic hives. Hives that appear and disappear in less than 6 weeks are known as acute hives. In most cases, they do not present any serious health threat. However, they can be uncomfortable, unsightly, and inconvenient.   Did you know? Severe cases of hives may cause serious health complications. The airway can swell shut or nearly shut, impairing breathing and swallowing capabilities. Anyone with these types of symptoms should seek immediate emergency help and use an

Read More »

Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer.  There are 3 main types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common type and occurs in the basal layer of the top layer of the skin, hence its name.   Basal cell cancers are caused by sun exposure.  Basal Cell cancers are almost always curable. It is best however to come to the office when the basal cell is small and early so that it can be treated in a simple manner. Some basal cell skin cancers are superficial and can be treated with topical prescriptions such as Imiquimod or effudex. Some Basal cell cancers can be treated with treated with surgical procedures (excision, electrodessication and curettage, Mohs Micrographic Surgery). Mohs surgery is not required on all basal cell skin cancers. If the basal cell is deep or

Read More »

Moles

A mole is a pigmented spot on the outer layer of the skin. Moles are produced when cells called melanocytes cluster with tissue. Melanocytes are spread evenly all over your skin and when your skin is exposed to sun, they cause the area to tan. Almost everyone has at least one mole. Whether hated for aesthetic reasons or worn proudly like  Cindy Crawford’s famous beauty mark, moles are more common than you may realize. The average person has anywhere from 10 to 40 moles. Moles are not only brown. They can be the color of your skin, or different shades of pink, tan, or even dark blue. Hormonal change in puberty or during pregnancy can make moles darker or larger. Only about 2% of babies are born with moles. Moles can appear early in childhood. Some will appear later, usually until around age 20. The cause of moles is unknown,

Read More »

Warts

Warts are caused by a viral infection in the top layer of the skin. Warts are contagious and can be passed from person to person. The treatments for warts include prescription creams applied to the warts , oral medications, freezing the warts with liquid nitrogen, or the candela V beam laser. The treatment is tailored to the location, size and age of the patient.

Read More »

Scabies

Scabies is a skin condition caused by mites that burrow into the skin and lay eggs. Mites are not visible on the skin and go relatively unnoticed until the skin begins reacting to the mite infection. Usually, the skin responds by forming a rash that itches and worsens without treatment. However, it can take up to 6 weeks for this reaction to occur, giving the mite plenty of time to feed and reproduce. People who suspect they may have scabies or have been exposed to the mite that causes it should see a dermatologist. Did you know… that scabies is contagious and can affect anyone regardless of how clean they are? Though the mite responsible for scabies cannot survive without a host, it can live for 2 to 3 days while it searches for one. This means that it is possible to contract scabies mites from objects like clothing, although

Read More »

Acne

Teenage acne is common but that doesn’t mean the condition should be ignored.  Mostly aggravated by the abrupt arrival of new hormones that stimulate the dormant oil glands, causing plugging of glands followed by redness, swelling,  and sometimes even pain. Teenage acne is usually emotionally distressing at a time when self-esteem may be somewhat fragile. Treating acne can not only prevent scarring but also alleviate self-esteem concerns. We offer a large variety of acne treatments for teenagers utilizing a broad range of prescription topical medicines, oral prescription antibiotics, and vitamins, chemical peels, hormonal therapy such as birth control and Isotretinoin (Accutane). When deciding how to treat teenage acne, our providers will assist by evaluating all of the options available and assembling a treatment plan with the teen and parent based on a patient’s individual circumstances. The treatment of teenage acne will often combine different modalities based upon the type and severity of the acne. Acne

Read More »

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease that causes raised, red, scaly patches to appear on the skin, especially the elbows, knees and scalp. Scientists do not know the exact causes of psoriasis but feel that the immune system and genetics play a major role. Psoriasis is associated with other serious health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, and depression. About 30 percent will develop joint pain and psoriatic arthritis. Psoriasis can be mild, moderate or severe in terms of how much area of skin it involves. Some patients are nearly completely covered with this skin condition. This disease has been shown to affect a person’s quality of life. Treatments for mild psoriasis can include topical prescriptions for steroid creams, synthetic Vit D cream, and retinoids. Systemic medicines are pills taken by mouth and are used for patients with moderate or severe psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Some of these systemic medicines include

Read More »

Eczema

Eczema, also known as Atopic Dermatitis, is known as the “itch that rashes.” Between 10-20% of people in the world are affected and, in most cases, it begins to appear very early in life. In young children, atopic dermatitis presents with itchy, red, scaling patches on the scalp and on the cheeks. By adolescence, eczema tends to move to the inner arms and the back of the knees, but can also affect other areas of the body. In adulthood, atopic dermatitis looks like dry, thickened, scaly skin. While the cause of atopic dermatitis is not known, studies do show that patients with eczema have a weak skin barrier. As a result, more irritants and allergens can penetrate. Several factors are known to trigger or make it worse. Possible triggers include irritating soaps or detergents, wool clothing, jewelry, and perfume. Sometimes patients with eczema need skin allergy testing to help get

Read More »

Rashes

Rashes, blisters and itching can be from a common conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, or allergic contact dermatitis.  However, your condition could be a more rare condition such as Dermatitis Herpetiformis associated with Gluten, lupus, vasculitis or malignant T cell lymphoma. These rare diseases are best diagnosed by a board certified dermatologist who has the expertise and experience to know when and how to test for them. Specialized blood tests and skin biopsies are used. If your skin condition is not resolving, the diagnosis must first be reconsidered and more extensive treatment options discussed.  Communication is the most important part of medicine and we will work with our patients so that they can fully understand how to control of their skin disease.

Read More »

Melanoma

Melanoma is cancer of the pigmented cells found in a mole. Melanoma is thought to be due to genetics, excessive sun exposure, tanning booths, and sunburns. Melanoma diagnosis is made through a surgical biopsy or excision of the skin that is done by your dermatologist. The prognosis and treatment of melanoma depend on the type of melanoma, depth of the lesion, and whether has spread to the lymph nodes or other organs. This year there has been an exciting breakthrough with gene testing of the melanoma. The gene testing can be done even if you were diagnosed with melanoma a few years ago. The genes can determine if the melanoma is at risk to spread through the body. This is important because more close follow up can now be done on those people who have melanoma with this specific pattern of genes. We offer this new important testing by CastleRock

Read More »

Hives

Hives are an inflammation of the skin that are identified by their pink or red tones and itchiness. Hives look different from person to person, ranging from tiny dots to large welts. Sometimes, hives occur as the result of an allergic reaction. But for some people, hives can appear without warning, regenerating and staying for weeks or months on end. Dermatology patients who have hives for more than 6 weeks are diagnosed with having chronic hives. Hives that appear and disappear in less than 6 weeks are known as acute hives. In most cases, they do not present any serious health threat. However, they can be uncomfortable, unsightly, and inconvenient.   Did you know? Severe cases of hives may cause serious health complications. The airway can swell shut or nearly shut, impairing breathing and swallowing capabilities. Anyone with these types of symptoms should seek immediate emergency help and use an

Read More »

Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer.  There are 3 main types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common type and occurs in the basal layer of the top layer of the skin, hence its name.   Basal cell cancers are caused by sun exposure.  Basal Cell cancers are almost always curable. It is best however to come to the office when the basal cell is small and early so that it can be treated in a simple manner. Some basal cell skin cancers are superficial and can be treated with topical prescriptions such as Imiquimod or effudex. Some Basal cell cancers can be treated with treated with surgical procedures (excision, electrodessication and curettage, Mohs Micrographic Surgery). Mohs surgery is not required on all basal cell skin cancers. If the basal cell is deep or

Read More »

Moles

A mole is a pigmented spot on the outer layer of the skin. Moles are produced when cells called melanocytes cluster with tissue. Melanocytes are spread evenly all over your skin and when your skin is exposed to sun, they cause the area to tan. Almost everyone has at least one mole. Whether hated for aesthetic reasons or worn proudly like  Cindy Crawford’s famous beauty mark, moles are more common than you may realize. The average person has anywhere from 10 to 40 moles. Moles are not only brown. They can be the color of your skin, or different shades of pink, tan, or even dark blue. Hormonal change in puberty or during pregnancy can make moles darker or larger. Only about 2% of babies are born with moles. Moles can appear early in childhood. Some will appear later, usually until around age 20. The cause of moles is unknown,

Read More »

Warts

Warts are caused by a viral infection in the top layer of the skin. Warts are contagious and can be passed from person to person. The treatments for warts include prescription creams applied to the warts , oral medications, freezing the warts with liquid nitrogen, or the candela V beam laser. The treatment is tailored to the location, size and age of the patient.

Read More »

Scabies

Scabies is a skin condition caused by mites that burrow into the skin and lay eggs. Mites are not visible on the skin and go relatively unnoticed until the skin begins reacting to the mite infection. Usually, the skin responds by forming a rash that itches and worsens without treatment. However, it can take up to 6 weeks for this reaction to occur, giving the mite plenty of time to feed and reproduce. People who suspect they may have scabies or have been exposed to the mite that causes it should see a dermatologist. Did you know… that scabies is contagious and can affect anyone regardless of how clean they are? Though the mite responsible for scabies cannot survive without a host, it can live for 2 to 3 days while it searches for one. This means that it is possible to contract scabies mites from objects like clothing, although

Read More »
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